Ofsted ‘extremely concerned’ about risk of indoctrination in illegal schools

The head of Ofsted has said he is “extremely concerned” about the number of young people who are at “significant risk of harm and indoctrination” by attending illegal schools.

Many more children than previously thought are being “hidden away” from view in illegal schools, Ofsted’s chief inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw has warned.

In a letter to education secretary Nicky Morgan today, Sir Michael states that his inspectors uncovered seven unregistered schools last month alone.

And the former headteacher has warned that the schools are “exploiting weaknesses” in the legislation that allows parents to home educate their children.

I have previously voiced concern that many of those operating unregistered schools are unscrupulously using the freedoms that parents have to home educate their children as a cover for their activities,” Sir Michael writes.

“They are exploiting weaknesses in the current legislation to operate on the cusp of the law. Many are charging thousands of pounds to send their children to these unregistered schools.”

The schools, he adds, are offering a “substandard education”, placing children at risk and “undermining the government’s efforts” to promote British values.

“I know we both share a determination to take swift and decisive action against those who are operating illegal schools and thereby putting children at risk of harm, including the risk of exposure to extremism and radicalisation,” Sir Michael states.

The chief inspector has previously written about his concern around illegal schools, and has asked a group of inspectors to work on the issue.

He said the group remain “deeply alarmed” by what they have found, which includes children eating their lunch near chemicals used in chemistry lessons, and staff and volunteers who have not been through the proper checks.

Last month, Ms Morgan told a select committee hearing that she would be looking into introducing more regulation around home educated children.

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